Guidelines for Safe Relocation of Feral Cats

Finding the Right Relocation Spot

Rural locations are generally best, because there is often a need on such properties for "mousers." Property owners with livestock have grain and hay, and rodent problems often go hand-in-hand. Also, agricultural concerns, such as organic farms and vineyards, are often seeking a poison-free alternative for the control of mice, rats, moles, voles, gophers, etc. Cats can be the answer! Network with friends, relatives, co-workers, and neighbors to see if you can find someone in need of a good hunter or three. You never know - a co-worker's neighbor might have an uncle with a ranch that would welcome barn cats. If you cannot find a barn home through networking, try putting up fliers at feed stores, agricultural supply stores, or farm animal veterinary offices. Forgotten Felines recommends asking a small adoption fee for a cat, to give it "perceived value" in the mind of the adopter, making it more likely that the adopter will care for the cat afterward. Unless it is someone you know and trust, we do not advocate giving a cat away for free. After all, they will be receiving a cat which is spayed or neutered and (hopefully) up-to-date on vaccines - a significant value!

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Feral Relocation Topics

  1. The Right Spot
  2. Screening
  3. Preparation
  4. Trapping for Relocation
  5. Follow Up

All Feral Cat Pages

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  1. What is a feral cat?
  2. Spay/Neuter Clinic for feral cats
  3. How to care for a colony
  4. Being a Colony Caretaker (YouTube video)
  5. How to trap humanely
  6. Humane Trap Sources
  7. How to relocate feral cats
  8. The Right Spot
  9. Screening
  10. Preparation
  11. Trapping for Relocation
  12. Follow Up
  13. How to tame feral cats
  14. Total Ferals
  15. Semi Ferals
  16. Reverted Ferals
  17. Foster Kittens
  18. Colony Caretaker's Thoughts
  19. Cats vs. Birds Controversy